Three Potential Negatives of the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC)

Three Potential Negatives of the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC)

 "Three Potential Negatives of the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC)"  Photo by Michael on Unsplash

"Three Potential Negatives of the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC)"

Photo by Michael on Unsplash

 

In Why you should Care about the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) we talked about how awesome the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) is and how it could positively impact your career. All of that is true but I think it is also worth mentioning that there are also potential pitfalls with that new legislature.

1. eNLC requires different state regulations and requirements

Each state has their own board of nursing and while the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) starts bridging that gap it still doesn’t change that there are some different scopes of practices for nurses that can vary from state to state. As it is currently constructed you are legally held accountable to the practice laws of the state you are practicing within, not necessarily your home state. That begs the question if I have a multi-state license how much research should I do prior to working in a state I have never worked in before?

2. eNLC raises questions about what defines practice location?

There is some confusion when it comes to telemedicine. If the patient and the nurse are in two different states than what is the practice location?  Depends on who you ask. The American Nurses Association (ANA) and others believe it is the state where the nurse has their primary license while the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) believes it is the state where the patient is.

3. eNLC vs NLC

As mentioned previously prior to the eNLC there was the nurse licensure compact (NLC) which was started in 2000. Most of the states from the original NLC have enacted legislation to adopt the new eNLC standards. As of the time of this writing three states Colorado, New Mexico and Rhode Island have failed to do so.  This means that when the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) goes live on January 19, 2018 nurses with a muli-state NLC license from those three states can only practice within themselves and will be excluded from practicing in the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) states.

While these aren’t necessarily deterrents from attaining a multi-state license it is something nurses should keep in mind.

Do you see any other negatives?

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*References*

 

How to Create a Personal Nurse Brand

How to Create a Personal Nurse Brand

Why you should Care about the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC)

Why you should Care about the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC)