Here's the answer to the question I got the other day about whether or not nurses will get paid to train.

This could be either new nurses fresh from nursing school or an experienced nurse about to start in a new department.

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Do Nurses get Paid to Train?

An experienced nurse starting in a new department will be paid for their orientation. As for new nurses, they will be paid for their new nurse orientation in most situations. Always double-check the terms of a job or training before accepting the position.

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Do Student Nurses Get Paid to Train?

If you're asking if you'll get paid to go through nursing school, the answer is no. You'll have to pay for your school tuition and fees to become a nurse. The exception is nursing students who are in the military. The military may pay you while in school to join the military afterward graduating.

Employers Will Pay to Train an Experienced Nurse

a nurse and a patient talking

I don't think I've heard of a situation where an experienced nurse was started in a new department and didn't get paid for the training.

What I have seen happen is that your employer will give you a signing bonus in hopes of committing you to work for them for a set period of time.

For instance, they might say we'll give you a $5,000 signing bonus if you commit to working with us for 2 years. If you leave before that 2 years is up, you'll have to pay back that $5,000 (may or may not be prorated payments).

This setup which pays you extra for joining and training with them does a couple of things:

  1. It attracts job applicants who like the initial bonus payment.
  2. It deters staff leaving because they'll have to pay back the money if they do.
  3. Because it helps to retain staff it makes your current staff happier.

Why Retaining Nurses Facilities Train is Important
One of the biggest reasons facilities need to retain nurses they train is that it's costly to train new nurses.

Some estimates could be $25,000 to $100,000 to train a new nurse.

I remember back when I was considering operating room nursing. I talked to an OR hiring manager, and she told me it costs her about $75,000 to train a new nurse.

Most Facilities Will Pay to Train a New Grad Nurse

holding a graduation hat

Most facilities are going to pay to train a new grad nurse. Most companies look at it as a cost of doing business.

Even for nurse externships that can be about a year long, facilities typically pay you while you're going through it.

There Are Exceptions
I have heard of a couple of hospitals either not paying for these long externships or making the new nurse pay for it.

Personally, unless it's a job I REALLY want, I probably wouldn't pick this option if possible.

Regardless it's always important to ask about compensation detail with human resources or the hiring manager before excepting any job opportunities.

New Nurse Academy

Graduating from nursing school is a joyful time, but it quickly leads to a lot of stress once you start working as a new nurse. Check out the course that helps new nurses bridge the gap and transition smoothly to becoming nurses.

Have You Read These Yet?

Frequently Asked Questions

Unless you have a scholarship or are in the military, you must pay for nursing school tuition and fees yourself. This situation is not different from if you want to be an engineer or a medical doctor.